Thursday, December 1, 2016

What's the deal?

Over the past two years, #M323 teacher-leaders have designed several centers associated with Common Core State Standard 6.SPA.2. Below is one of my favorites, which I am attempting to revise for my #M221 pre-service teachers. Any feedback you are willing to provide would be appreciated.

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Data Set Deal
Rules
  • Remove all the face cards and Jokers from a deck of cards;
  • Deal out five cards, face down, to each player;
  • Turn over exactly three cards;
  • Determine the mode (color), median (number), and range (number) of the three cards;
  • Other players check to see that your answers are correct [1 point per correct answer];
  • Predict the mode (color), median (number), and range (number) of all five cards;
  • Turn over another card;
  • Determine the mode (color), median (number), and range (number) of the four cards;
  • Other players check to see that your answers are correct [1 point per correct answer];
  • Predict the mode (color), median (number), and range (number) of all five cards;
  • Turn over the last card;
  • Determine the mode (color), median (number), and range (number) of all five cards;
  • Other players check to see that your answers are correct [1 point per correct answer];
  • Check to see which of your predictions were correct [2 points per correct answer]; and
  • The winner is the first one to 21 points.

Score Sheet
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Please leave any questions or suggestions in the comments. Thanks!

2 comments:

  1. Reminds me a little of James' Finding the Center game. https://rootsoftheequation.wordpress.com/2015/07/27/fighting-for-the-center/

    Do you feel mode for color is helpful? Seems like students get that idea pretty quickly, and it's not a lot of statistical value for mode out of 2. It is nice to have categorical data, though...

    Can they rearrange the cards when flipped? (Your example's in order.)

    Wondering about flipping over three cards each time. More data, and (maybe?) more likely the second prediction is accurate.

    Wondering about a 2 player game, where players turn over four cards and draft them (either wheeling 1-2-2-1 or two cards, then two cards). That way choosing cards to make their predictions come true. Right now, no interaction & little choice.

    Nora Oswald often does points by having a pile of chips, take one when they meet a condition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, John.

      You're right, the mode was intended to highlight categorical data. We certainly could add more cards. I've also played with seven, but any more than that is hard to display under a document camera.

      Yes, the cards can be rearranged. Should that be in the directions or something the players initiate? We were envisioning this as a review of the topics.

      I suggested that we add Jokers so that players could have some choice and make some decisions. The players thought that would make it more confusing. We might prototype it, though.

      What did you think of the score sheet? I think it's confusing.

      Delete

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